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Learn About PFAS

FIRST THINGS FIRST: WHAT ARE PFAS CONTAMINANTS?

ABOUT PFAS

PFAS SOURCES

ABOUT PFAS

PFAS DANGEROUS

What is PFAS

PFAS are industrial pollutants whose consequences are only now being discovered. Because PFAS is a large category that encompasses a wide range of compounds, it's critical to comprehend the chemical jargon, as well as a few oddly similar acronyms (PFAS, PFOS, and PFOA). So, let's clear things up... Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS for short, are a class of man-made chemicals utilised in the production of hundreds of products, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). PFAS are prevalent in the environment and in the human body and are employed in a range of industries.

Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are the two most widely generated PFAS (PFOA). Scientists have spent the most time studying the consequences of these two specific compounds, however there are over 4,000 other PFAS.

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WHERE DO PFAS COME FROM?

PFASs can be released into the environment from landfill sites where products and materials containing these chemicals are sent for disposal, as well as into ground and surface water through sewer discharges, in addition to contamination from the use of fire-fighting foams. PFASs are released into the environment from manufacturing facilities that handle them. The fact that PFOS and PFOA do not degrade in the environment and can move vast distances in water and air currents is the major environmental worry. Water Analytics Australia will ensure commitment to quality long-term partnerships with our clients and expert team.

WHY ARE PFAS DANGEROUS?

Although PFAS do not occur naturally in the environment, they are increasingly being detected in wildlife, fish, and humans. This is owing to the peculiar properties of PFAS, which repel water, oil, and stains and do not degrade rapidly or readily. PFAS has been dubbed the "forever" chemical because of its ability to build over time. According to a study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, millions of people have come into contact with PFAS-contaminated drinking water.

A recent research done by Harvard Chan School (Health risks of widely used chemicals may be underestimated) states a group of chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFASs—used in everything from carpets to nonstick cookware to firefighting foams—may pose much greater health risks than previously thought. A recent review from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) outlines a host of health effects associated with PFAS exposure, including liver damage, decreased fertility, and increased risk of asthma and thyroid disease. 

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/hsph-in-the-news/pfas-health-risks-underestimated/

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